This site requires cookies to function properly and provide insights for future article topics.

123rf53482308 largeHere’s the situation: The company is a 14-person, low-volume, specialty manufacturing company. Two employees, in two different roles, who are both capable and intelligent, appear to consistently do the wrong things.

An example is making a commitment to the owner that they will have a task completed in two hours, using a proven and agreed-to method.

A day later, the task is still not done

A day later, the task is still not done because they decided to research another, unproven way to complete the task.

They both like to learn for the sake of learning, and the owners have not found a way to make them accountable to a schedule and completing projects so that they can ship for revenue. Neither is motivated by money. Among the DISC personality types, both measure moderately high (80) for Steady and Conscientious. One is a Boomer and the other a Millennial. Any suggestions?

How to Handle This Situation

123rf3988353 largeThis is a problem that raises its ugly head frequently.

There is a classic failure at work here.

There is a classic failure at work here.

The solution is very straightforward although not easy.

(We cover this in our one-on-one coaching program in Module Two, Sessions 19 and 20: Delegation and the 10 elements of successful delegation.)

Unfortunately, the cause of missed tasks will almost always come back to the lack of skills and commitment by the delegating party. Once these skills are in place by the delegator, the individuals and the rest of the team will rarely, if ever, miss another task assignment or deadline.

How to Beat Vexing Business Situations

As business owners or managers, we run into situations where we have no background to help us sort things out and find solutions that work. It’s not anyone’s fault, if you ever played tennis or golf or whatever, you discovered that we’re not born knowing and to be good at that sport; we couldn’t progress far without a coach.

Our business coaching process gives you the background knowledge and a foundation of tips, strategies, insights and knowledge that you can use when facing unfamiliar situations. That will prepared to turn new challenges into a great opportunities.

Discover what we can do for your business, let’s start a conversation USA: 877.433.6225 feedback@focalpointcoaching.com.

But please remember:

All 10 elements must be in place. Nine or eight out of 10 equals virtually no improvement

All 10 elements must be in place. Nine or eight out of 10 equals virtually no improvement and a lot of same old, same old.

Yes, other things come into play, such as behavior style and Carnegie triangle, but the first place to start is with delegation skills. These and other elements will become clear very quickly.

Lastly, it is a common misunderstanding that business owners and managers believe that having the right people, doing the right jobs is the solution. However, this is very, very incorrect. This failed premise will deliver only 40 percent of the success drivers.

The real and practical condition is that they must have the right people, doing the right jobs, and doing the jobs right. If this third element isn't in place, the first two rarely maximize success.

I hope this helps. Just a quick reminder: Many times,

‘Simple’ is just not easy.

‘Simple’ is just not easy.

Lastly – and I am not trying to ruffle feathers here – but the suggestion that it’s a Millennial/Baby Boomer situation is potentially not the issue. This is addressed in Principles three and eight in our one-on-one Coaching, session 19, regarding who you should and should not delegate to, and the point is reinforced with the delegator that

consequences are not always negative.

consequences are not always negative.

The most valuable consequences are almost always positive and aligned with the delegatee's values and principles.

The most valuable consequences are almost always positive and aligned with the delegatee's values and principles.

Login